Faculty of Medicine, Dentistry and Health Lecture Series – 6th Annual Pemberton Lecture

Gilmore

“Alcohol:  evidence-based policies and practical implementation – mind the gap”

Professor Sir Ian Gilmore

Monday 3 October 2016 at 17.30 followed by a wine reception

The University of Sheffield Students’ Union Auditorium

Western Bank, Sheffield, S10 2TG

Free admission, by ticket only:  Please register here

‘Alcohol has been part of human culture for more than five thousand years and remains a topic of continuing interest – everyone is an expert on why we drink and how much. There is now a wealth of scientific analysis of consumption and harm in populations that differ in ethnicity, gender, age, equity and other variables, and this has allowed a clear picture of what works and doesn’t work in optimising our troubled relationship with alcohol. However there are so many vested interests in our favourite drug that putting this evidence into practice has met with challenges that remain unresolved but infinitely fascinating.’

Professor Sir Ian Gilmore is an honorary consultant physician at the Royal Liverpool University Hospital and holds an honorary chair at the University of Liverpool. He is a past-president of the Royal College of Physicians (RCP) and the British Society of Gastroenterology. He is chairman of Liverpool Health Partners, created to promote an Academic Health Science System in the city and he chairs the UK Alcohol Health Alliance. He is also President of Alcohol Concern and is a member of the Climate and Health Council.

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